45% of cybersecurity professionals have considered quitting the industry

45% of cybersecurity professionals have considered quitting the industry


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Today, end-to-end cybersecurity deep-learning provider Deep Instinct released the Voice of SecOps report, examining stress levels among 1,000 top cybersecurity and C-suite professionals.

The research found that 45% of cybersecurity professionals have considered leaving the industry and 46% know at least one person who left cybersecurity completely last year due to stress.

The most common causes of stress include the relentless threat of ransomware and analysts ’expectations of always being available or available.

These findings show that traditional approaches to security, which are typically based on a combination of different monitoring solutions with intense discharges, may not be sustainable. It also reveals that professional organizations may not be well equipped to deal with the threat of ransomware, creating a stressful work environment for security teams and ultimately increasing “great resignation.”

Ransomware Stress: A Loss-Loss Situation

Ransomware is one of the most stressful incidents for cybersecurity professionals to deal with because the operational impact can be disastrous, as the Colonial Pipeline attack highlighted last year.

Similarly, security guards are in a situation of loss or loss, forced to risk not paying a ransom, losing access to key data, or paying a ransom and relying on the intruder to decrypt stolen data.

In fact, too often attackers will not honor ransom payments. Thirty-eight percent of respondents in the Deep Instinct report admitted to paying a ransom, 46% said their data was still exposed by hackers, and 44% said they could not restore their data. .

At any time during the repair, negotiation or restoration, security analysts take the blame if something goes wrong.

“In a culture of guilt, the pressure of failure weighs heavily on security analysts. Visibility across the IT landscape is a challenge, and it leaves them blind to a lot of problems,” said Karen Crowley, director of security solutions. product of Deep Instinct. “They work for hours, sometimes 16 to 18 hours a day, to keep the organization safe and the responsibility for detecting incorrect settings or an error by an employee who clicks on a malicious link falls on them.”

The combination of an “imminent threat of breach,” chasing false flags and taking the blame for violations creates a high-pressure work environment for analysts to operate.

How Security Teams Respond to Ransomware Threats

The best defense that security teams have against ransomware threats is prevention.

While it’s easier said than done, proactive attack surface management and mitigation of environmental vulnerabilities can help. In addition, it’s important to take steps to educate employees about best security practices, such as selecting secure passwords and not clicking on links or attachments in emails from unknown senders.

If prevention fails, as the average ransomware attack takes just over three days from start to finish, successful intrusions give security analysts limited time to react to prevent data loss or encryption.

As a result, Crowley recommends that organizations invest in technologies that help reduce false positive alerts so that security teams have more visibility into their environment while having more valuable work time instead of pursuing false ones. flags.

He also notes that organizations are investing in solutions to send more high-fidelity alerts to EDR, SIEM, or SOAR solutions so that security analysts can investigate events that have been avoided and discover active threats on the network more quickly.

Of course, managed services also have a role to play in supporting overloaded security teams, especially if they have few resources or few staff.

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