NIST takes first steps toward a quantum-resistant cybersecurity standard

NIST takes first steps toward a quantum-resistant cybersecurity standard


NIST has selected four encryption algorithms designed to withstand an assault from a quantum computer, to be part of a new cryptographic standard.

The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has selected a set of encryption algorithms that it believes are capable of protecting data from future quantum computers.

Encryption is used in digital systems such as websites and emails to protect sensitive electronic information from third parties. It involves complex mathematical problems that modern computers cannot solve to keep data secure.

However, it is believed that quantum computers will soon be advanced enough to break with modern encryption measures, posing a future risk to cybersecurity in several sectors.

NIST has selected four encryption algorithms that it believes can withstand an assault from a future quantum computer. These will become part of a new standard that the institute hopes to complete in about two years.

The initiative to develop this standard began in 2016, when NIST asked cryptographers to develop and examine potentially quantum-resistant algorithms.

“Our post-quantum cryptography program has harnessed the most important minds in cryptography, worldwide, to produce this first group of quantum-resistant algorithms that will lead to a standard and significantly increase the security of our digital information,” the director of NIST, Laurie E. Locascio. dit.

A new cryptographic standard

The algorithms chosen by NIST are designed for general encryption on public networks and digital signatures, which are used for identity authentication.

NIST has selected the CRYSTALS-Kyber algorithm as the general encryption standard, due to its advantages of having “comparatively small encryption keys” and a fast operating speed.

The US institute has chosen three algorithms for digital signature encryption, and CRYSTALS-Dilithium is recommended as the main algorithm. NIST said the FALCON algorithm will be used for applications that need a smaller signature than the other algorithm can provide.

The final algorithm for digital signatures called SPHINCS + is noted to be larger and slower, but has been selected as a backup as it is based on a different mathematical approach from the other three options.

The U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) said this “new post-quantum cryptographic standard” will replace current public key cryptography and has shared a roadmap that organizations should follow to prepare. for the transition.

This includes educating the workforce about the upcoming transition, making an inventory of systems that use public key cryptography, and creating a plan to make the systems transition to the new standard.

10 things you need to know directly in your inbox every day of the week. Sign up for Brief diarythe Silicon Republic essential science-technology news collection.



Source link

Related post

AZ Big Media How to keep your web development projects on schedule

AZ Big Media How to keep your web development…

Do you have your best tip for keeping web development projects on time? To help you better manage your web development…
Interactive Whiteboard Global Market Report 2022

Interactive Whiteboard Global Market Report 2022

ReportLinker Key players in the interactive whiteboard market are Boxlight Corporation, Cisco System, Inc., Foxconn Technology Group, Google, Inc., Hitachi, Ltd.,…
Interactive Whiteboard Global Market Report 2022

Interactive Whiteboard Global Market Report 2022

ReportLinker Key players in the interactive whiteboard market are Boxlight Corporation, Cisco System, Inc., Foxconn Technology Group, Google, Inc., Hitachi, Ltd.,…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.